Children and Young People's Mental Health 2020: London Conference

  • Tuesday, 14 July 2020
  • Ambassadors Hotel, Bloomsbury, London
  • 08:30 - 16:00
150+
Conference
Attendees
8
CPD
Credits
10+
Expert Speakers
20+
Sponsors & Supporters
  • Overview

Our sixth national CPD accredited conference programme will explore emerging trends in children and young people’s mental health services, such as the interaction between online platforms for gaming/gambling and addiction; as well as existing issues with access to services, social media use and legislating to support CYPMHS and service users.

NHS England opened the first gambling clinic for young people last year in response to the number of children struggling with problematic gambling quadrupling. NHS leaders and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee have called for legislation that prohibits access to particular types of games and introduces fair spending limits. This conference programme will consider the impact of this ‘generational scandal’ on children and young people’s mental health, as well as exploring:

  • NHS Long Term Plan: Tackling harmful online behaviours like gambling and gaming addiction through new specialised clinics are part of the NHS Long Term Plan, as is widening access to services closer to home, investing in treatment of eating disorders and opening up services to 345,000 children and young people by 2023/24 through NHS-funded services – including in schools and colleges.
  • Online access: Review best practices for maintaining a healthy relationship between young people and the internet, considering a range of measures introduced to prevent internet use escalating harmfully, including the Information Commissioner Office's proposed code of conduct, duty of care legislation and incentives for big tech companies to meet regulation.
  • Barriers to communities accessing CYPMHS: Discuss the increasing volume of research into how young BAME communities and young people who identify as LGBT face specific barriers to accessing CYPMHS, such as experiences of dealing with institutions, perceptions of coercive power dynamics and anxieties surrounding identity and anonymity.
  • Service provision: The programme will look at CYPMHS that have dramatically improved the number of young people accessing services despite struggling with staff shortages and discuss whether the upturn is transferable.
  • Confirmed Speakers

Event Sponsors

  • Event Programme

08:30

Registration and Coffee in the Networking Area

09:25

Chair's Opening Address

09:30

Keynote Address

"Addressing the Generational Scandal"

In response to the rise in numbers of young people struggling with problematic gambling (55,000) and more young people regularly gambling (450,000) than taking drugs, drinking alcohol or smoking according to the Gambling Commission; the NHS has introduced clinics delivering specialist support to children and young people struggling with gambling addiction.

NHS leaders have called for restrictions on games that encourage children to purchase ‘loot boxes’ – randomised prizes that can be purchased in-game; as well as introducing realistic spending limits and supporting parents by raising awareness of the risks associated with gambling and in-game purchases. This presentation will review findings from the 2019 Gambling Commission’s report that portrayed the rise in child gambling as a ‘generational scandal’ and discuss practical responses, such as:

  • Raising awareness of the new online platforms gambling is being advertised to children and young people through, in the context of a new report published by OFCOM in which 3,200 young people between the ages of 3 - 15 were interviewed, demonstrating that 50% of the UK’s 10-year-olds owned a Smartphone in 2019, 21%, 71% of 12 – 15 year-olds have a social media platform and 24% of 3 – 4 year-olds own their own tablet.
  • Legislating to ban the sale of in-game items such as loot boxes to children under gambling law, as recommended by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.
09:50
  • Dr Bernadka Dubicka, Chair of Child and Adolescent Faculty, Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP) (confirmed)
"Technology Use and the Mental Health of Children and Young People"

The Royal College of Psychiatrists have published a new report Technology Use and the Mental Health of Children and Young People backed by the NSPCC and YoungMind, making high-impact policy recommendations to protecting children and young people’s mental health. The study looks at diverse types of interaction(s) with online resources and possible impacts on children and young people’s mental health, including exposure to bullying, exploitation, gambling or violent/graphic imagery; whilst contextualising the negative influences of tech in balance with the positive. The report contains recommendations for young people, parents, educators, clinicians and government, including:

  • Building on the suggested 2% levy on the UK revenues of major tech companies that fail to protect children online – the report recommends establish a levy commensurate to worldwide turnover – a ‘turnover tax’ that ring fences some of the money for mental health research may be more impactful.
  • Regulators should urgently review and establish a protocol for the sharing of data from social media companies with universities for research into benefits and harms on children and young people.
  • Making use of programmes installed in smartphones, tablets and consoles that limit the amount of time a child can spend online.
  • Enable the regulator to undertake a joint review with the UK Gambling Commission to review regulation regarding loot boxes, in line with other countries recognising loot boxes as a form of gambling.     
10:10

Headline Sponsor

10:30

Question & Answer Session

10:50

Coffee in the Networking Area

11:35
  • Dr Sarah Wynick, Head of Psychiatry CAMHS, The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust (confirmed)
  • Andrew Balfour, Consultant Clinical Psychologist & Adult/Couple Psychotherapist, Tavistock Relationships (confirmed)
"Working with Parental Couples in CYPMHS"

The acknowledgement that, where there is inter-parental conflict, whatever work is done for the child will be undone if there is significant inter-couple conflict, led to the opening of discussions between Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust and local charity Tavistock Relationships around the idea of attaching couples therapy to children and young people’s mental health services.

Since 2017 the couple’s therapist has delivered more than 300 sessions to parents of children who have been referred to CYMPHS. For some of these cases, the dysfunctional parental relationship was the primary cause of the child/ren’s presenting symptoms. For others, the child had difficulties of their own, e.g. ADHD, depression and anxiety but the parental difficulties were either getting in the way of their treatment or exacerbating the symptoms. In some cases the child’s chronic illness had caused the parental conflict, which was then keeping the child stuck in a negative cycle and impeding recovery.

 

Both the psychiatrist leading the multidisciplinary team and also the social worker in the service found that having a couple therapist with psychoanalytic training and perspective was invaluable in helping parents reflect on the nature and quality of their relationships, as well as enabling the service as a whole to think about couple dynamics from a psychoanalytic perspective more often and in a more thorough way.

Promisingly, outcomes for children (as well as parents) were very good, with reductions in children’s mental health problems and behavioural issues, and many of the cases closed as a result of this intervention.  

11:55
  • Dr Wendy Sims-Schouten, Associate Head (Research and Innovation) and Reader in Childhood Studies, The University of Portsmouth (confirmed)
"The Importance of Increasing Mental Health Support in Primary Education"

Dr Wendy Sims-Schouten's research and publications include work on increasing mental health support in primary and secondary education, as well as breaking-down barriers to accessing care - particularly for children and families from BAME communities.

 

Young people living with mental health issues are commonly diagnosed as early-teens, Dr Sims-Schouten argues there are signs and symptoms of specific mental health issues at primary school; in some instances, even in the early years foundation stage. The Department for Education's pledge to provide every school with a member of staff trained in mental health first aid only applies to secondary schools; does this mean children in primary schools with mental health challenges are being missed and not receiving the support they need? This presentation will make the case for increasing attentiveness to the behavioural issues of children, vulnerable groups and parental input pertaining to the mental health of children in the 2 to 11-year-old group.     

12:15

Case Study

This slot is reserved for organisations looking to engage delegates with services and opportunities that compliment conference presentation and discussion panel topics. If you're interested in delivering a Case Study, contact Jordan on 0161 376 9007.

12:35

Question & Answer Session

12:55

Lunch in the Networking Area

A hot, two-course lunch consisting of multiple options will be provided for delegates. We cater for all dietary requirements, including vegetarian, vegan and gluten/dairy-free; just notify us ahead of time should you have any allergens or requirements.

13:55

Chair's Afternoon Address

14:00

Afternoon Keynote

"Legislating to Protect Children and Young People's Mental Health"

Legislation to safeguard children and young people’s mental health and protect CAMHS is part of the NHS Long Term Plan. Other influential bodies such as the Information Commissioner’s Office have tabled a proposed code of conduct designed to incentivise big tech organisations to ensure children are protected from harmful online content, stating: ‘There are laws to protect children in the real world. We need our laws to protect children in the digital world too,’

 The code sets out the standards expected of those responsible for designing, developing or providing online services like apps, connected toys, social media platforms, online games, educational websites and streaming services. It covers services likely to be accessed by children and which process their data, including:

  • The privacy information provided to users, and other published terms, policies and community standards, must be concise, prominent and in clear language suited to the age of the child. Additional specific ‘bite-sized’ explanations about how personal data is used at the point that use is activated, should be provided.
  • Children’s personal data must not be used in ways that have been shown to be detrimental to their wellbeing, or that go against industry codes of practice, other regulatory provisions or Government advice.
  • Switching geolocation trackers/displays off by default - unless a compelling reason(s) to not do so is demonstrated, taking account of the best interests of the child. Provide an obvious sign for children when location tracking is active. Options which make a child’s location visible to others must default back to ‘off’ at the end of each session.
  • The prohibition of nudge techniques to lead or encourage children to provide unnecessary personal data or weaken or turn off their privacy protections.
14:20
"Barriers to Communities Accessing CYPMHS"

Particular barriers to accessing services can be addressed in light of an increasing volume of research into how young BAME communities face specific barriers to CYPMHS, such as experiences of dealing with institutions, perceptions of coercive power dynamics as well as anxieties surrounding identity and anonymity.

A report by the Education Policy Institute found that BAME children are considerably more likely to access counselling services if they are online and remain anonymous. The study analysed the demographics of people who engaged with an NHS commissioned online counselling platform for children and young people’s mental health available in more than 70 CCGs. Organisations such as Black Mental Health UK, MH Foundation and the Centre for Mental Health have responded to the growing body of work on assessing barriers to access, suggesting that higher rates of poverty and fewer good experiences of working with authorities – particularly amongst young BAME males – are likely contributing to keeping institutions and services at arm’s length. This presentation will look at innovative programmes that may require providers to consider the diversity of frontline staff and how services are delivered in communities.

This presentation will take into consideration that BAME is a term that covers a wide range of people with a very diverse range of needs and experiences that reflect their culture and context.

14:40

Case Study

This slot is reserved for organisations looking to engage delegates with services and opportunities that compliment conference presentation and discussion panel topics. If you're interested in delivering a Case Study, contact Jordan on 0161 376 9007.

15:00

Afternoon Refreshment Break

15:15

Panel Discussion

16:00

Chair's Closing Remarks & Conference Close

  • Register for event

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Luke Boulter
  • Gain 8 CPD Points.
  • Learn about the causality of dramatic rises in children and young people struggling with problematic gambling – discuss the impact this could have on their mental health. Explore responses including recommendations for legislation that prohibits access to particular types of games and introduces fair spending limits, as well as new codes of conduct that online services would be expected to comply with.
  • Share best practices for protecting children and young people from harmful content online, in the context of OFCOM’s annual report indicating 50% of the UK’s 10-year-olds own a Smartphone, 71% of 12-15 year old’s have a social media profile and 24% of 3-4 year old’s own a tablet.
  • Hear from organisations providing case studies of practical, transferable improvements to children and young people’s mental health service provision.
  • Discuss how particular barriers to accessing services can be addressed in light of an increasing volume of research into how young BAME communities and young people who identify as LGBT face specific barriers to accessing CYPMHS, such as experiences of dealing with institutions, perceptions of coercive power dynamics as well as anxieties surrounding identity and anonymity.
  • Explore proposals for more mental health support and interventions for children in primary education, as well as reviewing results of pilot programmes integrating inter-parental and couples work into CYPMHS.
  • Network and knowledge share with peers, keynote speakers and discussion panelists.
  • Contact Details
  • Sponsors
  • Venue
  • Featured Events
  • Downloads
  • Who will attend

Contact Details

Sponsors

Venue

Ambassadors Hotel, Bloomsbury, London

Ambassadors Hotel, Bloomsbury, London

Overlooking a quaint Dickensian lane in the Bloomsbury literary district, this 19th-century hotel with a grand exterior and a modern contemporary interior is a 5-minute walk from Euston tube and train station.

Featured Events

  • Mental Health: Delivering Improved, Integrated and Accessible Services

    • 27 February 2014
    • 08:30 - 16:30
    • Contact us for venue
  • Mental Health: The Five Year Plan

    • 23 September 2015
    • 08:30 - 16:20
    • America Square Conference Centre, London
  • Mental Health: Better, Faster and Earlier Help

    • 04 March 2015
    • 08:30 - 16:45
    • Manchester Conference Centre
  • Children and Young People’s Mental Health: Promoting Integration and Early Intervention

    • 08 December 2016
    • 08:30 - 16:30
    • Manchester Conference Centre
  • Mental Health: Forward Thinking – Delivering the Strategy

    • 15 September 2016
    • 08:30 - 16:45
    • America Square Conference Centre, London
  • Mental Health: Moving Forwards – The Five Year Plan

    • 10 March 2016
    • 08:30 - 16:30
    • Manchester Conference Centre
  • Mental Health: Making the Forward Plans a Reality

    • 27 September 2017
    • 08:30 - 16:45
    • America Square Conference Centre, London
  • Children and Young People’s Mental Health: Taking Early Action

    • 06 July 2017
    • 08:30 - 16:30
    • The Royal National Hotel, London
  • Mental Health: Forward Thinking – The Implementation Plan

    • 16 March 2017
    • 08:30 - 16:30
    • The Bridgewater Hall, Manchester
  • Children and Young People's Mental Health: Improving Care, Treatment and Support

    • 12 December 2017
    • 08:30 - 16:30
    • The Bridgewater Hall, Manchester
  • Improving Mental Health Outcomes: Integrating, Coordinating and Transforming Services

    • 25 April 2018
    • 08:30 - 16:30
    • The Bridgewater Hall, Manchester
  • Children and Young People's Mental Health: Providing Effective Support

    • 03 July 2018
    • 08:30 - 17:00
    • The Royal National Hotel, London
  • Meeting Mental Health Needs: Practical Interventions to Improve Services

    • 12 December 2018
    • 08:30 - 15:50
    • Mary Ward House Conference & Exhibition Centre, London
  • Children and Young People's Mental Health: From Early Intervention to Improved Services

    • 12 February 2019
    • 08:25 - 15:45
    • Mary Ward House Conference & Exhibition Centre, London
  • Improving Student Mental Health Outcomes

    • 16 May 2019
    • 10:00 - 16:05
    • Mary Ward House Conference & Exhibition Centre, London
  • Safeguarding Students: Addressing Mental Health Needs

    • 26 November 2019
    • 08:30 - 16:25
    • The Bridgewater Hall, Manchester
  • Media & Mental Health: Delivering A Duty of Care

    • 16 June 2020
    • 09:30 - 16:10
    • The Studio, Manchester

Downloads & Resources

  • Open Forum Events Sponsorship Brochure
    Open Forum Events offer a number of partnership, sponsorship and exhibition opportunities that can meet your marketing and business development needs.

who will attend

  • Academics
  • Acute and Community Mental Health Services
  • Allied Health Professionals
  • Area Managers
  • Business / Service Development Managers
  • CAMHS Clinicians
  • CAMHS Services
  • Care Co-Ordinators
  • Chairs of NHS Trust Board
  • Chief Constables
  • Chief Executives and Assistant Chief Executives
  • Clinical Commissioning Groups
  • Commissioning Managers
  • Directors / Heads of Adult Social Services
  • Directors / Heads of Children's Social Services
  • Directors / Heads of Housing
  • Directors / Heads of Nursing
  • Directors / Heads of Public Health
  • Disability Advisors
  • Equality and Diversity / Inclusion Managers
  • General Practitioners and Practice Managers
  • Heads of Commissioning
  • Heads of Service
  • Heads of Strategy
  • Headteachers
  • Health and Wellbeing Boards and Managers
  • Housing Associations
  • Medical Directors / Officers
  • Mental Health Researchers
  • Nurses
  • Pastoral Care Teams
  • Psychiatrists
  • Psychologists
  • School Counsellors
  • Social Workers